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About Us

My name is Alan.  And I love technology.  But that's not very important.

What's important to me is that our two daughters grow up loving technology, and not be scared by it.  That they empower themselves by understanding how the things they interact with everyday work.  Then - just maybe - they'll even be the engineers of the future.  Imagine stuff.  Build stuff.

So when our eldest girl challenged me to build a robot, I became (unusually) determined.  I wanted to show her what can be done... and the how can be learnt later.  After all, there is nothing more exciting and encouraging than seeing technology come alive.  Move.  Groove.  Quite literally.

This site documents that journey.

We aren't experts.  Our inventions aren't going to change the world.  But that's precisely the point.  Because it's about proving that anyone can understand technology.  And in the process, we might learn a useful thing or two.

Enjoy!

Read more about our Mission Statement here.


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Tea minus 30

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