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I. Rosie

10 steps to get our robot Rosie moving around the house, using a Raspberry Pi.

We begin with basic setup of the Pi and Raspbian OS, before rapidly descending into the crazy world of the Python programming language.   And somewhere along the way, we make her wheels move using DC motors, help her to avoid collisions using ultrasonic distance sensors and make her both controllable and independent, remotely, using the power of the web.  All very useful stuff that will allow Rosie to do something more productive in the future.

1I’ve got Pi(3) brainSetup your Pi to run the Raspbian operating system
2Why-Fi-ght the Wi-Fi?Make your Pi remotely accessible, using Wi-Fi and SSH
3Hurrah-ndom inventions Create your first Python application
4Don't reinvent the eelPlay around with DC motors and wheels
5Achoo! Crash-choo! Episode IUse ultrasonic distance sensors to avoid obstacles
6Achoo! Crash-choo! Episode IIUse Python threads to run lots of tasks in parallel
7Web of PiesMake a web interface for your Pi, using Python Flask
8Hello supervision, goodbye supervisionUser Supervisor to run your application in the background
9Abject, disorientated programmingUse Python classes to make your code more sophisticated
10Rough around the hedgesCreate your own Python motor controller application

You'll get to dabble in:

  • Raspberry Pi
  • Raspbian operating system (basically Linux)
  • Hardware (DC motors, RGB LEDs and ultrasonic distance sensors)
  • Python programming language, with all the frilly object orientated bits
  • Flask web framework
  • Supervisor for starting / stopping your magnificent invention

Proof is in the pudding:


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